New York Times: In Chicago, Overlooked Achievements by L.G.B.T.Q. Artists

New York Times: In Chicago, Overlooked Achievements by L.G.B.T.Q. Artists

CHICAGO — Because photographs record a moment that has passed, they are by nature poignant. But a particularly bittersweet mood infuses an ambitious exhibition here of photographs, paintings and videos of L.G.B.T.Q. art. The show, titled “About Face: Stonewall, Revolt and New Queer Art,” through Aug. 10 at the Wrightwood 659 art exhibition space, is the most unconventional of the Stonewall anniversary shows. It is made up of mini-retrospectives of artists who are, for the most part, underrecognized. Some were lost to AIDS in the ’80s and ’90s. A number of those spared by the virus have coped with alcohol and drug addiction.

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Queer/Architectural Passing in Wrightwood 659’s “About Face”

Queer/Architectural Passing in Wrightwood 659’s “About Face”

Midway through its fourth exhibition, “About Face: Stonewall, Revolt and New Queer Art,” the Wrightwood 659 has become a permanent yet still covert fixture of Lincoln Park. Tucked between residences on Wrightwood Avenue, the Tadao Ando-designed museum opened in mid-2018, slated as an exhibition space for architecture and socially engaged artwork. “About Face” is one of several exhibitions commemorating the fiftieth anniversary of the Stonewall riot, a symbolic beginning to the American gay rights movement. The exhibition takes Stonewall’s anniversary as a point of departure, offering an intergenerational survey of queer artists who investigate, bend or wholly reject stable notions of sexuality, gender, race and personhood.

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Unity Temple Restoration Project Wins Prestigious Urban Land Institute Chicago Vision Award

Unity Temple Restoration Project Wins Prestigious Urban Land Institute Chicago Vision Award

Oak Park, Illinois, July 16, 2019 - The 2019 ULI Chicago Vision Awards winners were named at an event held on July 10 at Rockwell on the River in Chicago. The Unity Temple Restoration Project was the winner in the category of Historic Restoration just days after the National Historic Landmark was also named a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Developer UTP, LLC and restoration architect Harboe Architects helped bring this Frank Lloyd Wright masterpiece back to life.

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Not Just Stonewall: New Show Explores 50 Years of Queer Art

Not Just Stonewall: New Show Explores 50 Years of Queer Art

Fifty years ago next month, the Stonewall riots in New York City started the modern gay rights movement (at least, they did in the popular imagination). A new exhibition at Lincoln Park’s Wrightwood 659 challenges how we think of Stonewall’s place in history – and offers a comprehensive survey of 50 years of queer art.

About Face: Stonewall, Revolt and New Queer Art” uses the 1969 uprising as less of a defining concept and more of a jumping-off point.

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Celebrating Chicago music critic Andrew Patner

Celebrating Chicago music critic Andrew Patner

CHICAGO—On Friday, May 3rd, 2019, the University of Chicago Press and the Italian Cultural Institute of Chicago will present a panel discussion celebrating the work of Andrew Patner and the publication of A Portrait in Four Movements: The Chicago Symphony under Barenboim, Boulez, Haitink, and Muti (May 2019).

Andrew Patner was a Chicago-based journalist, broadcaster, critic, and interviewer. Patner was the celebrated classical music critic for the Chicago Sun-Times from 1991 until his death, at age 55, in 2015. On his weekly radio programs on WFMT, “Critical Thinking” and “Critic’s Choice,” Patner interviewed both renowned and up-and-coming conductors and composers.

This discussion of Patner’s life and work will feature the book’s three contributors, New Yorker music critic Alex Ross, attorney John R. Schmidt, and musicologist Douglas W. Shadle.

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DIMENSIONS OF CITIZENSHIP: ARCHITECTURE AND BELONGING FROM THE BODY TO THE COSMOS

DIMENSIONS OF CITIZENSHIP: ARCHITECTURE AND BELONGING FROM THE BODY TO THE COSMOS

Dimensions of Citizenship: Architecture and Belonging from the Body to the Cosmos, the official U.S. entry at the recently-concluded 16th International Architecture Exhibition of the Venice Biennale, will be on view for the first time in the United States at Wrightwood 659, a new art space located at 659 W. Wrightwood Avenue in Chicago, from February 15 through April 27, 2019.  Devoted to exploring the notion of citizenship today and the potential role of architecture and design in creating spaces for it, Dimensions of Citizenship comprises seven unique installations, each created by a transdisciplinary team of architects and designers. Commissioned by the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC) and The University of Chicago (UChicago) on behalf of the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, the U.S. presentation of Dimensions of Citizenship on view at Wrightwood 659 in Chicago is made possible by Alphawood Foundation Chicago. The exhibition will be accompanied by a range of public programs exploring citizenship and belonging, including talks, performances, workshops, and engagement with local partners (to be announced shortly).

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Artist Talk: Tadao Ando

Artist Talk: Tadao Ando

Pritzker Prize-winning architect Tadao Ando returns to Chicago to discuss his body of work, noted for its visual simplicity and sensitivity to the surrounding environment.

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Alphawood Exhibitions Announces Ai Weiwei’s Trace

Alphawood Exhibitions Announces Ai Weiwei’s Trace

(CHICAGO, IL – April 6, 2018)—“Ai Weiwei: Trace in Chicago,” an exhibition of one of the renowned Chinese artist’s most significant projects in recent years, will be presented in Chicago—in its first showing in the Midwest—from May 9 to June 30, 2018. Presented by Alphawood Exhibitions and organized by the Smithsonian’s Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, DC, the site-specific installation will be on view at 659 W. Wrightwood Ave., in Chicago’s Lincoln Park neighborhood. In order to maintain an intimate and contemplative experience of the work, admission is limited and by online reservation only. Free timed tickets will be available shortly. To receive a notification when free tickets become available, please register at alphawoodex.org. Walk-ins will not be accommodated.

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“THEN THEY CAME FOR ME” Sen. Schumer visits ICP in New York

“THEN THEY CAME FOR ME” Sen. Schumer visits ICP in New York

A dark moment in America’s history re-visited by New York’s senior senator. Chuck Schumer is here with his reaction to the International Center of Photography’s exhibition about Japanese internment camps here in the U.S. He’ll explain why he feels the exhibition is particularly timely.

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South Side Community Art Center named National Treasure

South Side Community Art Center named National Treasure

“This will increase our public profile, and people who didn’t know about us before will know us now,” said Masequa Myers, executive director of the center. “This new relationship will make available resources and give us exposure that the center deserves. We will be a bigger part of the tourism promotion, and visitors to the city will know the South Side Community Arts Center is a place you must see.”

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Cloud Gate Dance Theatre of Taiwan

Cloud Gate Dance Theatre of Taiwan

In the 16th century, gazing out from the decks of ships off the coast of China, Portuguese sailors saw it: a great green mass, thick with mountains and trees, rising from the sea. “Formosa!” they exclaimed—“beautiful!”—anointing the verdant place that would come to be known as Taiwan. In this new work, choreographer Lin Hwai-min and his Cloud Gate Dance Theatre of Taiwan take that appraisal as inspiration for their own work of abstract beauty born from land and lore.

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Tadao Ando Lecture

Tadao Ando Lecture

Alphawood Foundation Chicago and the Architecture and Design Society of the Art Institute of Chicago are pleased to present an evening with Tadao Ando. 

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Can the Incarceration of Japanese Americans Shed Light on Today’s Immigration Questions?

Can the Incarceration of Japanese Americans Shed Light on Today’s Immigration Questions?

Alphawood Gallery used to be a bank. For its latest exhibition, focusing on Japanese Americans incarcerated in U.S. camps during World War II, Alphawood curators placed a video of former Chicagoan inmates in front of the old bank vault, bars and all. The effect is striking: A familiar gallery in Chicago’s Lincoln Park neighborhood has become a jail.

“Then They Came For Me” marks the 75th anniversary of President Franklin Roosevelt’s signing of Executive Order 9066, which authorized the "internment" of all people on the West Coast thought to be a threat to national security. Nearly 120,000 people of Japanese descent were “evacuated to and confined in isolated, fenced, and guarded relocation centers,” according to the U.S. National Archives and Records Administration.

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John Vinci: Life & Landmarks

John Vinci: Life & Landmarks

Please join
IIT College of Architecture and
the Mies van der Rohe Society

as we honor John Vinci (ARCH '60), and celebrate the new book by Robert Sharoff and William Zbaren: 
 

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Then They Came for Me on CAN TV

Then They Came for Me on CAN TV

Alphawood Gallery presents “Then They Came for Me,” an exhibition about the incarceration of Japanese Americans during WWII. This program was recorded by Chicago Access Network Television (CAN TV).

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Arts Organization, Sustain Thyself: Foundations Join Forces to Build Capacity

Arts Organization, Sustain Thyself: Foundations Join Forces to Build Capacity

The Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events, along with Alphawood Foundation, the Gaylord and Dorothy Donnelley Foundation (GDDF), and the Richard H. Driehaus Foundation—collectively known as AD3—understand this dilemma, so they created an "Innovation Bootcamp" geared toward small nonprofit organizations in the Chicago area.

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Grantmakers for Effective Organizations The Learning Conference 2017 Recap

Grantmakers for Effective Organizations The Learning Conference 2017 Recap

The Learning Conference 2017 offered a range of perspective and ideas on learning for continuous improvement. As grantmakers, we want to know if our efforts are making a difference and how we can improve our work over time. Often, we are not getting the most from evaluation, because it is in isolation from grantees, communities and peers, and too few of us are sharing what we’re learning, both in our successes and failures.

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