Archaeology

Tulane archaeologists help unearth Maya monuments

Tulane archaeologists help unearth Maya monuments

“More than half the temple is still to be excavated,” notes Marcello A. Canuto, co-director of the project and Director of Tulane University’s Middle American Research Institute. “This is a beautifully preserved stucco mask from one of the early periods of this interesting site.”

Read More

In Search of the Lost Empire of the Maya

In Search of the Lost Empire of the Maya

Take a closer look, and you may notice that most of these hills are arranged in massive rings, like travelers huddled around a fire on a cold night. An even closer look reveals that parts of the hills are made of cut stone, and some have tunnels carved into their sides. In fact they’re not hills at all but ancient pyramids, left to decay after the collapse of the Maya civilization a millennium ago.

Read More

Maya Metropolis

Maya Metropolis

Walk into any archaeologist’s laboratory and you’re likely to see bags of broken pottery. Walk into Bárbara Arroyo’s laboratory in a warehouse on the edge of the ruins of Kaminaljuyú in Guatemala City and you’ll find bags containing millions of pottery sherds, stacked almost to the ceiling. Millions more sit in the vaults of the National Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology a few miles away. Outside Arroyo’s laboratory, she and her team have dumped thousands upon thousands more ancient ceramic scraps into a large hole. “They can’t take any more at the museum,” she says with a shrug, gesturing out a window at the overflowing pit

Read More

Maya Shrine Reveals Arrival of ‘New World Order’

Maya Shrine Reveals Arrival of ‘New World Order’

A stunning and unexpected discovery in Guatemala is providing researchers with important new information on the fierce rivalry between two Maya superpowers that raged during the apex of the empire some 1500 years ago. (Discover the top 10 Maya Secrets.)

The find of a broken stone monument at the site of El Achiotal in Guatemala’s western Petén may depict a local vassal lord, or ajaw, installed by Siyaj K’ahk’ ("Fire Is Born"), a warrior-ruler from far-off Teotihuacán, near modern Mexico City. (Who built Teotihuacan?)

Read More